Workers Comp Attorney Washington DC

Questions Employees Commonly Ask

There are many questions for a workers comp attorney Washington DC employees ask when they have been hurt on the job. At Cohen and Cohen, P.C., we have worked with many employees who have been injured on-the-job to determine what kind of compensation they may be entitled to. While each situation is different and there is no substitution for a legal professional when it comes to understanding your rights, we’ve laid out a few general answers to some of the common questions a top workers’ comp attorney Washington DC has to offer on our team has been asked:

  1. What is worker’s compensation?
    If you are injured on the job, worker’s compensation is a type of insurance designed to take the place of the wages you would normally have earned during your recovery period. In exchange for receiving worker’s compensation wages, you generally give up the right to sue your company for negligently causing your injury. If you ask a workers comp attorney Washington DC employees consult with about this topic, you might hear this kind of agreement called a “compensation bargain.”
  2. What is covered by worker’s compensation?
    Workers compensation coverage can vary according to location, so it is important to speak with a top workers comp attorney Washington DC residents turn to for answers about what you can expect to receive based on the circumstances of your situation. However, generally speaking, the following reimbursements are common reimbursements for qualified, injured employees:

    1. Weekly workers compensation payments in place of wages. Similar to disability insurance, you may receive weekly worker’s compensation payments instead of the wages you earned before getting injured.
    2. Compensation for wages lost in the past as well as in the future. To explain, if you were injured on the job and because of that injury you had to reduce your hours from full time to part time, the wages you lost from not working as many hours would figure into wages lost in the past. To the extent that you may lose future earnings because of your injury, that would be considered as compensation lost in the future.
    3. Reimbursement for medical expenses. Much like health insurance, you may be reimbursed for medical costs related to your work injury which may include anything from surgery to physical rehabilitation therapy. To determine exactly what costs are eligible, you may want to consider speaking to a workers comp attorney Washington DC trusts. Our attorneys at Cohen and Cohen are here for you.
    4. Beneficiary benefits. If a person dies as a result of a workplace accident, their dependant(s) may be eligible to collect worker’s compensation benefits on their behalf, including reimbursement of medical costs incurred while trying to keep the person alive, and in place of the wages that the person would have earned if they had lived and not been killed or injured. For more detailed information, it may be in your best interest to consult with a workers comp attorney Washington DC families have hired to represent them after a loved one died in a workplace accident.
  3. What isn’t covered by worker’s compensation?
    A DC personal injury lawyer can review your case to determine exactly what laws may or may not apply. Under most workers comp plans, general damages for suffering and pain are not included, and neither are punitive damages in response to employer negligence.
  4. Are the rules the same if my employer is the federal government?
    Not necessarily. While a workers comp attorney Washington DC federal workers hire to represent them can give you more specifics, because the United States federal government has its own workers compensation program, rules and requirements may differ from state-run workers compensation programs.
  5. Can my employer legally punish me for filing a worker’s compensation claim following a workplace injury?
    In most states, no, they can’t; but a workers comp attorney Washington DC trusts should be able to tell you how the laws may apply to you. If you do not file a worker’s compensation claim for an injury you suffered while on the job, you may have to pay for medical costs out of your own pocket, which can add up quickly. In addition, you risk missing work while getting treatments, which can mean lost wages or eventually losing your job. These are all issues that should be considered if you are not sure whether or not to file a worker’s compensation claim.
  6. How Do I File a Workers Compensation Claim?
    The first step is to immediately report your injury to your company. A workers comp attorney Washington DC residents turn to for help should be able to tell you exactly how many days you have to report that injury.
     
    Your company should then be able to provide the necessary documentation to file a workers comp claim. If you need any assistance filling out those forms, a workers comp attorney Washington DC residents turn to may be able to help you.If your claim is not disputed by your employer, the insurance company will likely contact either your or the company representative with information on how to submit your work injury related medical bills and receipts for reimbursement.
      
    However, even if your claim may be legitimate, your company could fight it in an effort to reduce their costs. This is when hiring a worker’s compensation lawyer can make all the difference. Our attorneys at Cohen and Cohen have fought for workers’ rights for the last two decades. We believe in the right of workers to receive just compensation for injuries suffered on the job.

  
Request a Free Consultation to Learn More About Worker’s Compensation Benefit Claims

At Cohen and Cohen, we are available 24/7. Call us immediately if you experience a workplace injury. At our no-risk, free initial consultation we can discuss the details of your workers compensation case and help you determine the compensation you may be entitled to. When you have questions for a workers comp attorney Washington DC employees know they can rely on, contact Cohen and Cohen, P.C. for help.